Statistics

In 1997–2020, the Republic of Lithuania granted the refugee status to 973 foreigners, 3915 foreigners received subsidiary protection. In 2020, the refugee status was granted to 80 foreigners and subsidiary protection was granted to 1 foreigner.

To compare:

  • In 2019, the refugee status was granted to 79 foreigners and subsidiary protection was granted to 13 foreigners.
  • In 2018, the refugee status was granted to 136 foreigners and subsidiary protection was granted to 18 foreigners.

Overall, in 2020, foreigners lodged 321 applications for asylum in Lithuania. From the total of 250 first-time asylum applications received in 2020, most of them were lodged by Belarusian (78), Russian (63), and Tadzhikistan (36) nationals. During this period, an asylum (either the refugee status or subsidiary protection) was granted to citizens from Russia (24), Turkey (19), Tadzhikistan (12), Syria (10), Iran (4), Afghanistan (2), South Sudan (2), Sudan (1), Azerbaijan (1), Belarus (1), Egypt (1), Cameroon (1), Libya (1), Uzbekistan (1) and 1 stateless person.

In 2020, 266 asylum applications were denied. The procedure of consideration was terminated to additional 254 applications.

During the first half-year of 2021, foreigners lodged 656 applications for asylum in Lithuania. The refugee status was granted to 56 foreigners and subsidiary protection was granted to 2 foreigners.

In 2020, following the request by other European Union Member States, the Republic of Lithuania took over the consideration of 544 asylum applications (most of them – 266 – lodged in Germany). 6 foreigners were relocated to Lithuania from other EU countries (1 national of Afghanistan and 5 Syrian nationals).

In 2020, 268 foreigners (mostly – 90 – Tadzhikistan nationals) participated in the social integration program at the Refugee Reception Center. During the same year, 283 foreigners (mostly – 75 – also from Tadzhikistan) participated in the social integration program run by municipalities.

Last year, 34 foreigners embraced an opportunity to work provided that their asylum application is still in process (mostly – individuals aged 25-40).

Sources:

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